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News - Agricultural

April 2015

HOPS and De Lacy Executive join forces to help plug industry skills gap

Employers and job seekers in the agricultural and horticultural sectors are set to benefit from a new working relationship between HOPS and De Lacy Executive.

HOPS, which is wholly owned by the National Federation of Young Farmers' Clubs (NFYFC), has joined forces with agri-business recruitment consultants De Lacy Executive to help fill the industry's skills shortage.

Both companies are sourcing candidates for executive and practical roles and will provide one-to-one advice and guidance to employers throughout the recruitment process.

Job seekers can also obtain career advice throughout the application process and will be offered opportunities to gain practical experience.

Both companies have in excess of 40 years' recruitment experience in the sector and are committed to supporting the industry especially through encouragement of opportunities for the next generation.

John Hardman, Director at HOPS, said:

"We are delighted to be working closely with De Lacy Executive to offer the industry more support in finding skilled labour. With over 25 years' experience in the industry we understand the challenges both employers and job seekers face. Our connections with De Lacy Executive are helping us find more people jobs and making the recruitment process a lot simpler for businesses in the agriculture and horticultural sectors."

John Davies, Director, De Lacy Executive, said:

HOPS offers excellent opportunities for those seeking a practical career on the land and for those seeking to gain more practical experience for alternative executive careers in the industry. De Lacy Executive is pleased to be working more closely with HOPS, and in so doing, to be indirectly supporting the NFYFC.

For more information please visit:

www.hopslaboursolutions.co.uk and www.delacyexecutive.co.uk

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